Silk Sonder — 80 Journaling Prompts for When You Don’t Know What to Write About

Close-up shot of student hand holding pen and writing in notebook, working at home. E-learning

If you’re feeling stuck—whether it’s in your personal or professional life—journaling can help close the gap between where you are and where you want to be.

“Journaling helps us to clarify thoughts and feelings, reduce stress, solve problems and helps to resolve disagreements with others, says Janet Philbin, LCSW. “In my 21-year practice as a clinician, I have found journaling to help my clients improve coping skills, maintain emotional regulation, decrease worrisome and obsessive thoughts, improve sleep and journaling allows for integration of traumatic experiences.”

When you sit down to start journaling, the words might not always flow onto the page, and that’s completely normal! If you’re unsure what to write, Philbin recommends the following prompts:

Journal a list of five things you did today that brought you joy and write down why.

Journal a list of five things that upset you today and write down why.

Sit still for a moment and journal how your body is feeling at this moment in time, use as much description as possible.

What are you afraid to speak out loud but wish people knew about you?

What was one thing you felt proud of yourself for today?

If you were to say one thing to yourself that is loving what would that be and why do you need to hear that?

What is something you have always believed about yourself and why?

What is something you always felt you wanted to accomplish and what has held you back?

Imagine your perfect day and write down all of the details.

What TV or movie characters do you most identify with? Write as many details as possible.

Mary Potter Kenyon, certified grief counselor and Therapeutic Art coach, program coordinator at a spirituality center and author of Expressive Writing for Healing: Journal Your Way from Grief to Hope, suggests these journaling prompts to raise your self-awareness and heal emotionally. 

Make a list of all the lies you tell yourself. Now go down the list, cross out the lie and write the truth.

Everyone has a story to tell. What’s yours?

Author Lewis Carroll marked never-to-be-forgotten days in his journal as “white-stone” days. What are some white-stone memories in your days?

Without thinking about it too much, make a list of ten milestone moments in your life from birth to now, moments, good or bad, that stood out. Now, take one of those moments and write more about it.

You don’t have to be a writer to express yourself through writing. When the writing is for ourselves, and not for publication, there are no rules. Try writing a free verse poem. It doesn’t have to rhyme, nor does it have to follow a certain format.

What have you learned about yourself in facing difficult situations? Maybe you are stronger, or weaker, than you ever imagined. Make a list of your strengths.

You are going to feel emotional pain during difficult experiences. That is a given. The question is; what are you going to do with that pain? Will you use it to propel you do make changes in your life, to become a better person, or to reach out to others? Write down some ways you can mine your pain.

Research has proven that practicing gratitude has health benefits. Make a list of three things you are thankful for. Some days, it might be as simple as a smile from a stranger.

If time or money were no object, make a bucket list of sorts, a list of all the things you’d like to do or experience in your life. Now, choose one, and make plans to do it,

Look back to your childhood. What were you naturally drawn to? Where did your natural interests and talents lie? Make a list of activities you loved as a child. Now, choose one and make plans to incorporate that same activity into your adult life.

Fill in the blank with these simple yet powerful prompts from Alexander Burgemeester, Neuropsychiatrist and Founder of “The Narcissistic Life:”

I couldn’t imagine living without…

I really wish others knew this about me…

One thing I wish I felt comfortable doing is…

What I loved most about today is…

The biggest surprise of my life in the past year has been…

The biggest lesson from my biggest mistake, so far, is…

What inspires me most is…

The State of Women — Amplifying Her Voice Featured Speaker: Janet Philbin

Amplifying Her Voice

The next speaker from the Amplifying Her Voice “In Moms We Trust” Summit we’d like you to meet is Janet Philbin, who spoke on our “Coping With Trauma and Stress” panel.

Philbin; a licensed clinical social worker, hypnotherapist, and conscious parenting coach; helps adults heal from the emotional pain and trauma of their pasts. She has spent the past 21 years helping people emotional wounds and change their lives, and is the author of Show Up For Yourself: A Guide to Inner Awareness and Growth, an Amazon bestseller offering a framework for emotional healing.

In our Q&A, Philbin discusses how showing up for ourselves can help us be there for others, the new and increased challenges faced by women and mothers, the importance of compassion and following your own path, the example we set for our children when we show up for ourselves, and more.


What inspired you to join Amplifying Her Voice for Mother’s Day?

I think it is important for mothers and women to understand themselves. I want to offer support and resources to help moms feel connected to themselves.

What most drives and motivates you each day?

What drives day motivates me each day is always stretching to know myself better and to continue on my healing journey. When I am working on myself I have the internal resources to be there for others.

Who is your role model, and why?

My role model is my grandfather. He was a Holocaust survivor. He taught me the value of family, the value of consistency, the value of following through, and honoring your word.

What cause, company, group, or movement are you a part of that you would like to share with us?

I am passionate about sharing and teaching conscious parenting. We can help children of today by helping their parents heal.

What do you think are some of the most pressing issues facing moms, families, and caregivers today?

I think moms are juggling so much. Now with the challenges of COVID, stress is higher. The pressures of online school, working, and trying to find balance each day are causing many people to reach their emotional limit in their ability to cope effectively. Moms need even more support as they continue to traverse this new territory.

How do you think issues like poverty, violence, racism, oppression, and inequality intersect with motherhood and with being a woman?

I think women have always been the ones fighting and advocating for their children. When a woman is also struggling with poverty, violence, racism, oppression and inequality then the challenges to survive and raise their children are magnified. Many women are living with more than one of these issues at a time. They are survivors. As a woman you are already faced with inequity so adding any other trauma creates even more of a barrier for women to be empowered to effect change in their lives.

IndigoBlue Magazine – Reparenting Yourself and Healing the Inner Child

By Kate Orson

It is never too late to heal and recover from the past. Doing so can help us to lead happier, healthier, and vibrant lives in the present. Reparenting is defined as the act of giving to yourself what you didn’t receive as a child. Our parents did the best they could with the knowledge and resources they had available at the time, but we all grow up with hurt and wounds from not having all of deepest needs met.

You may have heard the concept that each of us has an ‘inner child’ within our psyche. Janet Philbin is a licensed social worker, hypnotist, and conscious parenting coach. She describes the inner child as something real which exists within our subconscious. Our inner child is a reflection of those unmet needs from childhood.

Philbin says that if we are not aware of our inner child they can end up ‘running the show.’ We end up reacting in ways similar to how we did as a child. For example, using coping skills such as ‘tantrums, becoming a people pleaser, lying, withdrawing, enabling,’  This can be challenging but there are ways we can connect to our inner child and meet their needs, so that we can reparent ourselves.

How Finding Gratitude for Painful Life Experiences Helps You

Written by: Janet Philbin, Executive Contributor

Executive Contributors at Brainz Magazine are handpicked and invited to contribute because of their knowledge and valuable insight within their area of expertise.

It is easy to be in gratitude for the good things in life, but how about the bad, not so good, or unwanted.

Have you ever had an Ah-Ha moment? Mine was, “I am in gratitude for my trauma.” I was shocked and questioned how it was possible to be grateful for my painful life experiences. I wanted to understand what contributed to my transformation from pain to gratitude.

How do you find gratitude for unwanted life experiences? As I researched gratitude, everything I read was about how to be in gratitude for the good and positive things in life. What about gratitude for the not so good, or as Pema Chodron calls it, “the unwanted,” the bad, the struggles, and pain. Chodron says, “Use all the unwanted things in your life as a means for awakening compassion for yourself and others.” In other words, it’s important to be in gratitude for the unwanted in our lives, the not so good.

I also turned to Osho. In his book, “Buddha,” he talks about the Buddhist principle of Thahata, which means suchness. The attitude of suchness is described as: accept it. It is about accepting what is, as it is when it is. When you don’t fight what is in front of you, there is a shift because when the attitude of suchness is within us, healing can follow.

It would be wonderful if we only had good experiences, but the chances are that is not the case because life is generally full of ups and downs. Can you reflect on the downs, the ones you wish had never happened, the ones when you raised your hands and asked, “Why Me? Haven’t I been through enough already?” Can you find gratitude for those times?

Have you asked yourself these or similar questions?

  • Does this serve a purpose?
  • Haven’t I already learned this lesson?
  • Didn’t I already have enough trauma/drama in my life?
  • Didn’t I do my time (so to speak)?
  • Why do I have to take on more now?

Sadly, you cannot undo the past. I wonder what happens when you apply the concept of suchness to these questions?

Show up for yourself-The path to emotional healing with Deb Blum

DEB BLUM

 

Janet and I focused on emotional healing in today’s discussion.  Janet has such a depth of experience and training in the area of healing on a cellular level.

She shared a bit about her own path to spiritual awakening and healing. We talked about how so many of us feel afraid to go into our pain but that it’s never as scary as we fear it to be. But that we do need to feel the feelings in our body in order to heal and that all of us have an inner child that needs to be attended to.

This episode was filled with so much good stuff. If you want to heal and find your way to a place of less suffering and more inner peace, Janet shares so much wisdom. Tune in to learn more! 

Parenting in the Thick of it- Showing up for yourself During Covid19

Have you ever wondered HOW you show up for yourself? And what does it really mean? If you are curious, you will want to make sure you catch this episode where I discuss just this with Janet Philbin. Janet is a friend, colleague, author of Show Up For Yourself, therapist, hypnotherapist, parent coach and more and you will LOVE everything about her. She is amazing. Tune in…

Free Download

CHAPTER 1: Conscious Relationship With Self

 

Subscribe to our newsletter!

Join our mailing list to receive the latest newsletter and free gift.

You have Successfully Subscribed!